Courses

The page is designed to give students an overview of course offerings across the three campuses of the University of Toronto.

Courses are listed according to Department and Program in alphabetical order. The courses are updated every semester, with the current listing reflecting courses for 2015-2016 academic year.

Please note that this is a guide to undergraduate courses. Graduate students should speak directly to Professors they are interested in studying with to inquire directly about Graduate courses.

Students should get in touch with the Department directly if they are interested in a specific course. Students are also encouraged to talk to the Director of the IIS about their interest and inquire about courses also. Please remember that this is not an exhaustive list, but as complete a list as possible.


ANT 426H1 — Western Views of the Non-West

The history and present of western concepts and images about the ‘Other’, in anthropological and other scholarship and in popular culture. The focus is on representations of Muslims and Jews.

Prerequisite: ANT 370H1 or ANT 329H1 or any 300-level course in NMC or in Jewish Studies

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course

Breadth Requirement: Creative & Cultural Representations (1)


HIS 336H1-S — Medieval Spain, 600-1492

This course emphasizes the interaction of Christians, Muslims, and Jews, and the cultural and political distinctiveness of Castile and Aragon in the development of state, society, and culture in medieval Spain. Some of the topics discussed are: religious and ethnic pluralism in Islamic Spain; Christian conquest and settlement; frontier society; divergent Castilian and Catalan-Aragonese cultural and political traditions; the dynamics of Christian-Muslim-Jewish coexistence in Castile and Aragon; the Spanish Inquisition; Castilian hegemony; and early imperial expansion. The format of the course will be lecture with periodic discussion of assigned primary and secondary source readings.
Instructor: M. Meyerson
Lecture: T 2 & R 2-4
Division: III
Pre-Modern: ½ credit


HIS 389H1-S — L0201 Topics in History: The Balkans Since 1800

The course provides an overview of the history of the Balkans (Southeastern Europe) from the beginning of the 19th century until the present day. It examines Balkan societies under the rule of the Ottoman and Habsburg empires, Ottoman reform efforts, the rise of nationalist movements, the establishment of the Balkan nation-states, the dissolution of empires in the course of World War I, interwar dictatorships and peasant societies, the experiences of World War II, the impact of the Cold War, life under communist regimes, the violent break-up of Yugoslavia and discussion of current problems in the region. Special attention is paid to the expressions and consequences of nation-building policies, and relations between majorities and minorities.
Instructor: M. Methodieva
Seminar: T 2-4
Division: III


HIS 389H1-S — L0301 Topics in History: The Ottoman Empire, 1800-1922

The course examines the history of the Ottoman Empire from the beginning of the nineteenth century until its dissolution in the course of World War I. Topics include the Ottoman reforms and their impact on the Empire’s diverse populations, the diplomatic interactions that came to be known as “the Eastern Question,” the Young Turk revolution, and the Balkan wars. It also explores the Ottoman legacy in modern Turkey, the Middle East and the Balkans.

Recommended preparation: some background in nineteenth and twentieth century history

Exclusion: NMC355H

Instructor: M. Methodieva
Lecture: R 2-4
Division: I/III


HIS 412Y1-Y — Crusades, Conversion and Colonization in the Medieval Baltic (Joint undergraduate/graduate course – HIS412Y1/HIS1283HF)

This year-long seminar will explore the impact of crusades, religious conversion and colonization on medieval Baltic history. The focus of the course will be on close reading and analysis of two medieval chronicles in English translation. Our readings and discussions will include topics such as ‘culture clash’, medieval colonialism, Europeanization as well as German expansion eastwards, the role of the Teutonic Knights and the strategies of survival of the native Baltic people after conquest and Christianization.

Textbook(s): The Chronicle of Henry of Livonia, 2003; The Livonian Rhymed Chronicle, 1977; Alan v. Murray (ed.), Crusade and Conversion on the Baltic Frontier 1150-1500. Ashgate, 2001; Marek Tamm, Linda Kaljundi & Carsten Selch Jensen (eds.), Crusading and Chronicle Writing on the Medieval Baltic Frontier. Ashgate, 2011, and a packet of readings complied by the instructor.

Tentative Course Requirements: seminar presentations (30%), one major research paper in the spring term (50%), participation & attendance (20%).

Recommended Preparation: one course in Medieval European History.

Instructor: J. Kivimäe
Seminar: R 5-7
Division: III
Pre-Modern: 1 credit
[/toggle_content]


NMC103H1F — Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations III: The Islamic World [24L/12T]

An introduction to the history, lands, peoples, religions, and cultures that came under the influence of Islam and that, in turn, contributed to the formation of Islamic civilization. Topics to be covered include an overview of the geographical and ethno-linguistic scope of the Islamic world, the role of the Qur’an and Arabic language, the major Islamic empires, the production and transmission of knowledge, law and society, and literary and artistic expressions.

Exclusion: NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NML110Y1 — Introductory Standard Arabic (formerly NML210Y) [96L/24P]

This course is an introduction to the formal variety of Arabic used throughout the Arab world. It is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic language and it follows a teaching approach that places equal emphasis on the development of all language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The fundamental learning philosophy underlying this approach is that proficiency in a foreign language is best achieved through consistent, deliberate, and systematic practice. From the outset, students are strongly encouraged to develop the habit of consistently and continuously practicing learned material.

Prerequisite: Priority enrollment will be given to declared NMC majors/specialists.
Exclusion: Native speakers/NML210Y1
Enrolment Limits: Attendance during the first week is mandatory.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML310Y1 — Intermediate Standard Arabic II (formerly NML310Y/NMC310Y1) [96L/24P]

Students enrolled in this course are assumed to have active knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary covered in previous two levels. After a brief review, the course continues from where NML211Y1 leaves off. Following the same teaching approach and learning philosophy, emphasis is placed on balanced development of all language skills. Throughout the course, students are introduced to increasingly complex morphological and syntactic patterns of Arabic. This is achieved through analysis of texts covering a wide range of genres. By the end of the course, students are expected to achieve advanced level of proficiency.

Prerequisite: NML211Y1 or permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: Native speakers/NMC310Y1. Priority enrollment will be given to declared NMC majors/specialists.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML315H1 — The Structure of Arabic Language (formerly NML415H1) [24L]

This course is an investigation of the formal properties of Modern Standard Arabic. Its primary goal is to provide the student with an in depth knowledge of the grammar of the language. To this end, the course makes use of concepts and tools of analysis common to contemporary generative linguistics.

Prerequisite: NML211Y1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: NML415H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML410Y1 — Advanced Standard Arabic [96S]

Students enrolled in this course are assumed to have active knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary covered in previous levels. After a brief review, the course continues from where NML310Y1 leaves off. Following the same teaching approach and learning philosophy, the goal of this course is to enable the students to reach a superior level of proficiency in Arabic. To this end, the materials covered are designed to strengthen the students reading and writing skills, refine and expand their knowledge of sentence structure, morphological patterns, verb system, and enrich their cultural background. The primary method is analysis of sophisticated authentic texts covering a wide range of genres and drawn from different parts of the Arabic speaking world. Although the main focus remains to be on Modern Standard Arabic, texts from the Classical Arabic literary tradition will be introduced incrementally throughout the course.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 or permission of instructor.
Exclusion: Native speakers/NMC410Y1.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML411H1 — Readings in Arabic Newspapers [24S]

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize advanced students of Arabic with structural properties, styles, and discourse features of the language used in the Arabic Press.  To achieve this goal, class time is devoted to directed readings of authentic texts covering a wide range of topics and are drawn from various Arabic newspapers.
The newspaper articles assigned for reading are approached from a purely linguistic point of view.  It is not the course objective to assess the factual accuracy of the content of the articles nor is it to evaluate the validity of the claims and assumptions made by their authors.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 or adequate reading knowledge of Arabic.
Exclusion: Native speakers of Arabic must obtain permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML412H1 — Introduction to Classical Arabic Literary Prose [24S]

This class surveys the rich and varied literary prose tradition in the Arabic language from the Qur’an to the Mamluk era. These works are frequently referenced in modern Arabic literature, in addition to being beautiful and intellectually challenging in their own right. We will read essayistic epistles, in addition to narrative works of a variety of genres, including biographical compilations, maqāmāt, anecdotes, histories, and fables. All texts are in the original Arabic.
The course focuses equally on developing reading skills and grammatical knowledge specific to classical Arabic texts, and on developing an ability to analyze the themes, literary techniques, generic features, and ideas within those texts.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 (third-year Arabic) or permission of the instructor.
Heritage speakers are encouraged to take this class, and should seek permission of the instructor.


NML413H1S — Introduction to Classical Arabic Poetry [24S]

In this class, we will read some of the most famous and frequently quoted poems of the pre-modern Arabic literary tradition, drawing from a wide variety of genres and periods. Readings include pre-Islamic poetry, Abū Nuwās, al-Buhturī, al-Mutanabbī, and Ibn Nubāta, among  others. All texts are in the original Arabic.
The course will introduce Arabic prosody, and allow students to develop skills in deciphering difficult verse using available reference material. Strong grammatical knowledge is presupposed. Class discussion focuses on poem structures, historical background, and close reading techniques.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 or NML412H or permission of the instructor.


NMC258H1 — Persian Literary Classics (formerly NMC258Y1) [24L]

Introduction to a millennium of Persian poetry and prose. Selected readings in translation from such classics of Persian literature as the Persian national epic (Shah-nameh), Attars Conference of the Birds, Rumis Masnavi, and Sadis Rose Garden.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML260Y1 — Introductory Persian [144L]

The fundamentals of modern standard Persian grammar, with emphasis on attaining fluency in reading and writing simple texts. Also serves as a basis for classical Persian. (Offered in alternate years)

Exclusion: Native users. Priority enrollment will be given to declared NMC majors/specialists
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML360Y1 — Intermediate Persian [144L]

This course involves reading, grammatical analysis, and translation of representative samples of contemporary Persian prose of intermediate difficulty. The reading materials are selected from a wide range of sources in order to ensure balanced, yet comprehensive exposure to the different usage of the language. The course serves as preparation for courses on both classical and contemporary Persian literature.

Exclusion: Native users. Priority enrollment will be given to declared NMC majors/specialists
Recommended Preparation: NML260Y1 and/or adequate knowledge of modern Persian
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML460Y1 — Classical Persian Literature [72S]

Survey of Persian literature, chiefly poetry, from the 10th to the 15th centuries, based on selected readings at an advanced level from representative authors, including Rudaki, Nizami, Sadi, Rumi, and Hafiz, as well as from the Persian national epic, Shah-nameh. Introduction to the Persian prosodial system, and analysis of the rhetorical devices and imagery employed by the classical poets Intended for upper year students.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or adequate knowledge of classical Persian
Recommended Preparation: NML260Y and/or NML360Y and/or adequate knowledge of modern and/or classical Persian
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML461H1 — Modern Persian Poetry [24S]

A survey of modern Persian poetry using connected passages of Persian texts.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or adequate reading knowledge
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML462H1 — Modern Persian Prose [24S]

A survey of modern Persian prose using connected passages of Persian texts.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or adequate reading knowledge
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NML463H1 — Structural Development of Iranian Languages [24S]

Development of Old Persian (551 BC) to Middle Persian (331 BC) to Modern Persian (7th century) with emphasis on word formation and grammar. Discussion is based on texts written by historians, linguists and grammarians who see language as a system which is changed by internal and external factors like politics, religion, immigration, business, etc.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: NML361H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NML270Y1 — Introductory Turkish [96L]

This course covers the essentials of Turkish grammar, and introduces students to reading and translation of passages of elementary difficulty. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Turkish. This course also serves as a basis for the study of Ottoman Turkish and other Turkic languages.

Exclusion: Native speakers
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC370Y1 — Intermediate Turkish [96L]

This course involves reading, grammatical analysis and translation of modern Turkish texts of intermediate difficulty. The reading materials are selected from a wide range of literary genres (short stories, poetry, essays, and newspaper articles). There will be a review of basic Turkish grammar, as well as an introduction of more advanced topics. This course serves as a preparation for further study of Turkish language and literature, as well as Ottoman Turkish language and literature.

Prerequisite: NML270Y1 or adequate reading knowledge of Turkish
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML470Y1 — Advanced Turkish [48S]

Advanced Turkish language practice designed to enable students to pursue independent work in Turkish and Ottoman studies. Differences between modern Turkish and Ottoman grammar will be pointed out. Elements of Arabic and Persian grammar that occur in Ottoman will be presented.

Prerequisite: NML370Y1 or adequate knowledge of Turkish
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML471H1 — Modern Turkish Literature in Perspective [36L]

This course surveys the main literary currents, figures, major themes, and motifs that define modern Turkish literature. Selected readings, including a variety of genres, such as short story, poetry, and the novel, will be used to map out a possible trajectory of modern Turkish literature, ranging from national allegories that pervaded early Republican Period to postmodern orientations.

Prerequisite: NML370Y1
Recommended Preparation: NMC278H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC365Y1 — Archaeology of the Islamic World [48L]

A survey of Islamic archaeology, covering the rise of Islam from 7th century to the end of the Fatimid period in 1171, examining sites in the Middle East, North Africa and Andalusia through the archaeological record, artifacts evidencing history, art history, urbanism and socio-ecology of early Muslim communities.

Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1/NMC184H1/NMC260Y1/NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC469Y1 — Mediaeval Middle Eastern Ceramics [72S]

An introduction to the ceramics of the Middle or Near East from the time of Alexander until recent times. A particular emphasis will be the elite glazed wares of the mediaeval and Islamic periods. Apart from providing a history of the production of ceramics and their social and archaeological context, this course is intended to train archaeologists and art-historians in the fundamental field recognition and identification of the various types and their production origins, and the course will rely heavily on the collections of the ROM.

Prerequisite: NMC260Y1 and at least one other upper-level course in archaeological materials
Recommended Preparation: NMC369Y1/NMC465H1/NMC365Y1/NMC366Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC392H1 — The Taj Mahal and Its Origins [24L]

Monumental architecture, whether for secular or religious purposes, played a special role in Muslim societies, particularly in major centres such as Isfahan, Samarkand and Delhi. Beginning with the Taj Mahal (1632) the best-known elements of Islamic architecture the double dome, the pointed arch, glazed tiles are traced retroactively in Iran, Central Asia, and India, and their social context is studied. (Offered every three years)

Prerequisite: One full course in pre-modern history of the Muslim world or Islamic art/material culture; or one full course in pre-modern art history (FAH)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC393H1 — Early Islamic Art and Architectures [24L]

A survey of the arts of the Islamic world from the 7th century to the Mongol conquest in the mid-13th century. Studying objects in the ROM collections of Islamic art.

Prerequisite: One full course from FAH or NMC in medieval art/history/culture
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC394H1 — Persianate Art and Architecture [24L]

A continuation of NMC393H1, covering art and material culture in the eastern Islamic lands from the late 13th century CE to the modern period. Studying objects in the ROM collections of Islamic art..

Prerequisite: One full course from FAH or NMC in medieval art/history/culture
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC396Y1 — The Islamic City [24L]

Architectural studies, historical sources and archaeological research are used to examine the physical and social morphology of the pre-industrial Islamic city from Central Asia to North Africa and Spain, from the 7th to the 17th centuries.

Prerequisite: One full course in Near Eastern/Islamic art and/or material culture
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC241H1 — Anthropology of the Middle East [24L]

This course offers an introduction to the contemporary Middle East from an anthropological perspective. Topics will include gender, kinship, religion, modernity, popular culture, and the study of everyday life.

Exclusion: RLG250H1, RLG355H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC270H1 — Christians of the Middle East [24L]

The course will introduce students to the Christian communities living in the Middle East since the distant past, identified by ecclesiastical and or ethnic terms, including Armenian, Copt, Greek-Melkite, Maronite, and Syriac. The course will discuss the plurality of their cultural, literary, and theological traditions, the social and intellectual roles of their monasteries, the contributions of their top religious authorities in diplomacy between Byzantium and the Sassanians, their position in the Islamic world and contributions to Islamic culture, philosophy, sciences, and theology, interreligious dialogues and polemics with Islam. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NMC101Y1/NMC102H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC273Y1 — Early Islamic History: The Prophet and the Caliphates [72L]

Features of the pre-Islamic Middle East inherited by Islamic civilization, birth of Islam, life and times of Muhammad, formation of Islamic empire and civilization, political disintegration of the caliphate, emergence of autonomous dynasties, the fall of Baghdad to Mongols in 1258 and the rise of the Mamluks.

Prerequisite: NMC103H1/NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC274Y1 — The Steppe Frontier in Eurasian and Islamic History [48L]

This course will unfold around the eastern and northern frontiers of the Islamic world from Central Asia in the east, to the Black and Caspian Sea steppes in the north, and from these frontiers its focus will move into the lands of the Middle East. For centuries Altaic peoples (Turks and Mongols), originally nomads in the Eurasian steppes (and mountains), played varied and crucial roles in the lands of the Middle East as raiders, migrants, slave-soldiers, conquerors, and state-builders. Topics to be covered include pastoral nomadism, steppe warfare, clan, tribal and state structures, ethnicity, sedentarization, and the roles of physical geography and ecology. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1/NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC275H1 — Muslims and Jews: The Medieval Encounter [24L]

An introduction to the encounter between Jews and Muslims in medieval times, when a majority of Jewish people subsisted under Muslim rule. An overview of religious/political/intellectual settings of the Judeo-Muslim experience is followed by exploring cultural cross-pollination, the Jews legal status under Islam, and interfaith politics. Source materials in translation.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC277H1 — Special Topics in Near and Middle Eastern History [TBA]

Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None


NMC278H1 — Introduction to the Modern Middle East [36L]

Historical survey of the principal countries of the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries. Themes include the interplay of imperial and local interests, the emergence of national movements, and the formation of modern states.

Exclusion: NMC278Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC241H1 — Anthropology of the Middle East [24L]

This course offers an introduction to the contemporary Middle East from an anthropological perspective. Topics will include gender, kinship, religion, modernity, popular culture, and the study of everyday life.

Exclusion: RLG250H1, RLG355H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC270H1 — Christians of the Middle East [24L]

The course will introduce students to the Christian communities living in the Middle East since the distant past, identified by ecclesiastical and or ethnic terms, including Armenian, Copt, Greek-Melkite, Maronite, and Syriac. The course will discuss the plurality of their cultural, literary, and theological traditions, the social and intellectual roles of their monasteries, the contributions of their top religious authorities in diplomacy between Byzantium and the Sassanians, their position in the Islamic world and contributions to Islamic culture, philosophy, sciences, and theology, interreligious dialogues and polemics with Islam. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NMC101Y1/NMC102H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC273Y1 — Early Islamic History: The Prophet and the Caliphates [72L]

Features of the pre-Islamic Middle East inherited by Islamic civilization, birth of Islam, life and times of Muhammad, formation of Islamic empire and civilization, political disintegration of the caliphate, emergence of autonomous dynasties, the fall of Baghdad to Mongols in 1258 and the rise of the Mamluks.

Prerequisite: NMC103H1/NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC274Y1 — The Steppe Frontier in Eurasian and Islamic History [48L]

This course will unfold around the eastern and northern frontiers of the Islamic world from Central Asia in the east, to the Black and Caspian Sea steppes in the north, and from these frontiers its focus will move into the lands of the Middle East. For centuries Altaic peoples (Turks and Mongols), originally nomads in the Eurasian steppes (and mountains), played varied and crucial roles in the lands of the Middle East as raiders, migrants, slave-soldiers, conquerors, and state-builders. Topics to be covered include pastoral nomadism, steppe warfare, clan, tribal and state structures, ethnicity, sedentarization, and the roles of physical geography and ecology. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1/NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC275H1 — Muslims and Jews: The Medieval Encounter [24L]

An introduction to the encounter between Jews and Muslims in medieval times, when a majority of Jewish people subsisted under Muslim rule. An overview of religious/political/intellectual settings of the Judeo-Muslim experience is followed by exploring cultural cross-pollination, the Jews legal status under Islam, and interfaith politics. Source materials in translation.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC277H1 — Special Topics in Near and Middle Eastern History [TBA]

Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None


NMC278H1 — Introduction to the Modern Middle East [36L]

Historical survey of the principal countries of the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries. Themes include the interplay of imperial and local interests, the emergence of national movements, and the formation of modern states.

Exclusion: NMC278Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC373H1 — Iran in the 20th Century [24L]

Situated within a world historical context, this course offers a critical history of modern Iran from the establishment of the Safavid Empire in 1501 to the Islamic Revolution of 1979. While focusing on institutional and political reforms and revolutions, it also explains the making of modern Iranian political, literary, and visual cultures.

Exclusion: NMC373Y1. NMC451H1 may not be taken in the same year
Recommended Preparation: NMC278H1/NMC348Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC374H1 — History of Islamic Egypt [24L]

A survey of the history of Egypt under Islamic rule from the Arab to the Ottoman conquest (1517 C.E.), including the Fatimid, Ayyubid and Mamluk dynasties. Issues treated thematically include conversion and inter-communal relations, relations with Syria, militarization of the political structure, including the military slave (mamluk) institution, religious currents, the impact of the Crusades and Mongol invasions, commercial and diplomatic relations, the emergence of Cairo as the centre of the later mediaeval western Islamic world. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Exclusion: NMC374Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC376H1 — History of Islamic Spain and North Africa (640-1492) [24L]

Muslim conquest of North Africa and Spain, history of Spain under Muslim rule to 1492. Attention given to institutional and cultural development, Islamic Spains relations with the Islamic east and neighbours in Europe. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC377Y1 — The Ottoman Empire to 1800 [48L]

A survey of the Ottoman Empire from its late 13th/early 14th century origins as a border principality through the classical age of Mehmed the Conqueror and Süleyman the Magnificent when as a mature Islamic Empire it ruled lands in Europe, Asia, and Africa, to the internal and external challenges faced by the empire during the 17th and 18th centuries when it underwent substantial transformation. Coverage includes topics in Ottoman institutions, economy, society, and culture. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Exclusion: NMC377H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC378H1 — Modern Arab History [36L]

A thematic treatment of the Arab lands of the Middle East and North Africa from 1700 onward, focusing on the Ottoman and colonial periods.

Prerequisite: NMC278H1/278Y1 and permission of instructor
Exclusion: NMC378Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC451H1 — Iranian Constitutional Revolution (formerly NMC359Y1/359H1) [24S]

Explores competing narratives of the Constitutional Revolution (19061911), particularly the transformation of public and private spheres and their corresponding modes of collective and personal self-presentation. Students explore revolutionary legacies, and the ways in which competing political, religious and ideological forces have attempted to shape the Revolutions memory. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC278H1/NMC278Y1/NMC348Y1/NMC373H1
Exclusion: NMC373H1 may not be taken in the same year; NMC359Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC471H1 — Topics in Early and Medieval Islamic History [24S]

A seminar organized around readings on a topic selected by the instructor. Possible topics might include authority and power in medieval Islamic society in the Middle East, slavery, women, taxation, landholding, iqta and payment of the military, waqf, etc. Intended for upper year students. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC472H1 — Theory and Method in Middle East Studies [24S]

Examines current theoretical and methodological trends in the study of the Near/Middle East. A seminar course, it consists of presentations, discussions, lectures, guest speakers, and documentaries. No previous knowledge of methodology required. Special attention will be paid to the politics, culture, political economy, gender, and ethics of various research practices. Intended for 4th year students only.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC473H1 — Intellectuals of the Modern Arab World (formerly NMC385Y1/NMC355H1) [24S]

The course is designed to re-examine the role of intellectuals in the Arab world and political events that shaped their thinking. It introduces the life and thought of some leading thinkers of the Arab world and relates their thought to the lived experience of political, social, economic and cultural change in the Middle East. Intended for upper year students. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NML410Y1Y or fluency in Arabic and 1 FCE from NMC278H1/NMC377Y1/NMC378H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC475H1 — Orientalism and Occidentalism [24S]

This course probes the contemporaneous formation of modern Oriental Studies in Europe and the emergence of discourses on Europe (Ifranj/Farang) in the Middle East from the eighteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be devoted to encounters between scholars in Western Europe, Iran, India, and the Ottoman Empire. This seminar-style course explains that Orientals gazed and returned the gaze, and in the process of cultural looking, they, like their Occidental counterparts, exoticized and eroticized the Farangi-Other. In the interplay of looks between Orientals and Occidentals, there was no steady position of spectatorship, no objective observer, and no aperspectival position. Intended for upper year students.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC476H1 — Politics of Archaeology in the Modern Middle East [24S]

This course examines the role nineteenth and twentieth-century archaeology played in Middle Eastern politics, the culture of colonialism and in nationalist struggles. The course will first familiarize the students with the diplomatic and intellectual context of the formation of archaeology as a field of study in Europe and analyse the role archaeology played in the production of knowledge about the Middle East. Next, the course will examine the archaeological practices on the ground (and underground) and inquire what happens in the contact zone between foreign and local archaeologists. Finally, we will trace the ways in which emergent nationalist discourse challenge, appropriate and imitate the historical narratives of Western archaeology.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.
Enrolment Limits: 20 max enrolment; NMC MA/SPE students get priority enrolment; open to ARH/ANT students too.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC478H1 — Modern Arab Societies [24S]

A seminar built around thematic readings of social and economic history of the modern Arab world. Offered every other year.

Prerequisite: NMC378H1 and permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC479H1 — Nationalism in the Arab World [24S]

A seminar that critically examines the types and varieties of national expression in Arab societies of the Middle East and North Africa, through a reading of common texts and students’ individual research projects. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC378H1 and permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC283Y1 — Islam: Religion and Civilization [48L]

This course will examine the religious beliefs and practices of Muslims. The period of time covered by the course is from shortly before the birth of Islam in the 7th century to the present. Attention will focus on the central concerns of the religion: God, Prophethood, Holy Book, Community, the Individual. The sources and development of the Sharí‘a, the teachings of the mystical tradition, the contributions to art and science, social institutions such as marriage and divorce, family life, the position of women in Islam, modern social changes and the more recent impact of the West on Muslim lands (and vice versa) will also be discussed. Lectures, assignments and workshops will be framed by the close identification between “religion” and “civilization” found in the Islamic sources, beginning with the Qur’an. Doubtless in part a reflection of the 7th century “view from the Hijaz,” of the contemporary and competing civilizations of the Christian Eastern Roman Empire in the west and the Zoroastrian Iranian Sasanid Empire in the east, this identification may be seen as a presupposition of Islamic religious discourse, beginning with the two foundational opposites, the defining and characteristic Islamic religio-cultural categories: jahiliyya, “ignorance, barbarism” and islamiyya, “Islām”. (Offered in alternate years.)

Exclusion: NMC185H1/RLG204Y
Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1/NMC184H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC285H1 — The Quran: Spirit and Form (formerly NMC285Y1) [24L]

Concern is mainly with the sacred character of the Quran (koran), its preeminence in Islam. Topics include: the idea of the sacred book, the Quran and the Bible, the influence of the Quran on Islamic spirituality, literature, theology, law, philosophy, and the various apporaches taken in interpreting the Quran. Knowledge of Arabic is not required. (Offered in alternate years)

Exclusion: NMC285Y1/RLG351H1
Recommended Preparation: NMC185H1/NMC283Y/RLG204Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC286H1 — The Quran: Reading and Transformation [24L]

This course is a continuation of NMC285H1. Students will be required to engage directly with the text in English or French translation, to discuss and write on major and minor quranic topics and themes and to study the works of other astute readers of the text. Arabic is not required or expected.

Exclusion: NMC285Y1/RLG351H1
Recommended Preparation: NMC185H/NMC283Y/NMC285H1/RLG204Y
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC381H1 — Modern Islamic Thought (formerly NMC381Y1) [24L]

Survey of major intellectual trends in the Islamic tradition, particularly those identified with Middle Eastern Muslim thinkers, from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include reformism, modernism, hermeneutics, feminism, Islamism, and liberal and progressive trends in contemporary Muslim thought. Readings in English translation.

Prerequisite: NMC185H1/NMC283Y1/RLG204Y1
Exclusion: NMC381Y1, RLG352H1
Recommended Preparation: NMC278H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC385H1 — Introduction to Islamic Law [24L]

The course will introduce students to the history, theory, and doctrines of Islamic law, and focus on hot-topics that are at the center of public debate in various regions across the world. Students will be required to do close readings of primary sources, provide oral and written responses to secondary literature, and engage the materials of the course in light of their own context and experiences. It will be designed for students from various departments, teach them critical thinking skills, and help them understand the dynamics of legal reasoning and analysis in a comparative perspective.

Prerequisite: NMC283Y/RLG204Y
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC387H1 — Islamic Mystical Tradition [24L]

Mysticism and spirituality in Islam: the Quran; doctrine; prayer; Sufism; Irfan (Shii mysticism). Themes include love, knowledge, authority, being, interpretation.

Prerequisite: NMC185H1/NMC283Y/RLG204Y
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC388H1 — Shii Islam I (formerly NMC386H1) [24L]

Subjects covered include the rise and development of the Shii version of Islamic orthodoxy from the mid-7th to the mid-13th centuries CE. Distinctive Shii interpretations of the Quran will be examined.

Prerequisite: NMC185H1/NMC283Y/RLG204Y
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC389H1 — Shii Islam II (formerly NMC386H1) [24L]

This course continues the study of Shiism from 1258 to the present day and will include the history and teachings of the various members of the Shii family of Islamic religion.

Prerequisite: NMC185H1/NMC283Y1/RLG204Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC481H1 — Muslim Gnostics and Mystics [24L]

This course will present for study a different prominent figure each year: Hallaj, Ghazali, Suhrawardi, Ibn Arabi, Rumi, Mulla Sadra, and so on. Attention will be given to their respective social and historical milieux, their modes of expression and experience, and the nature of their literary productions. There is no prerequisite, but students must be advanced undergraduates in the Humanities.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC484H1 — Gender-related Topics in Law and Religion (formerly NMC484Y1) [36L]

Abortion, rape, family violence and similar topics from the perspective of historical and legal development, scientific theory, socio-ethical attitudes and anthropological comparison in the Bible and other ancient Near Eastern sources, through Jewish legal texts to modern responses. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Exclusion: NMC484Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


RLG204Y1 — Islamic Religious Traditions

The faith and practice of Islam: historical emergence, doctrinal development, and interaction with various world cultures. Note: this course is offered alternatively with NMC283Y1, to which it is equivalent. Exclusion: NMC185Y1, NMC185H1, NMC283Y, RLG204H5 Recommended Preparation: RLG100Y1/RLG200H1/RLG280Y1


RLG350H1F — The Life of Muhammad

This course examines Muhammad’s life as reflected in the biographies and historical writings of the Muslims. Students will be introduced to the critical methods used by scholars to investigate Muhammad’s life. Issues include: relationship between Muhammad’s life and Qur’an’s teachings, literature about Muhammad, celebrations of his Night’s Journey and birthday, and the veneration of the prophet in poetry.


RLG351H1 — The Qur’an: An Introduction/ Not Offered 2013-14